The Maltonian Web


The Maltonian
The School Magazine

Number 1: April 1917

A slim offering of 16 pages

The very first school magazine - one had been planned for Autumn 1914, but was "postponed on the score of economy". A small fragment of this 1914 attempt is pasted inside Volume 1 of the bound magazines.

The magazine sets out on its pages the small lives of a small Yorkshire school, against a backdrop of the Great War. The momentous action on the world stage intrudes into this small school history, and into the lives, and deaths, of its pupils and teachers. A Roll of Honour is printed - "with details surpressed to avoid any assistance to the enemy"; a War Relief Collection is ongoing; Lieutenant Williams (later to be Headmaster) gained his commission in 1917 and was presented with a sword of honour; the school concerts were for "The Tommies" - at Swinton Grange and Hovingham - and for their wives and mothers at the Assembly Rooms.

More mundane school fayre comes in the shape of articles on French Epic Poetry, Our Concerts, The Tortures Inflicted Upon A Sensitive Mind By A Drawing Lesson, and I Take Form II. Articles are generally signed by nom de plumes - KUI, NIL DESPERANDUM, SIROD, the MARKSMEN - as was the fashion of the day.

Things We Should Like To Know was to become a regular feature in The Maltonian: A collection of obscure questions and statements, presumably capable of raising a knowing eyebrow, or of nodding an affirmatory head amongst the inner sanctum of its audience.

How did H-ld- lose her halfpenny? Who or what haunts Br--ght-n Rd. every fine moonlit night? Were all those who fled from Algebra to the kitchen on the fatal January 25th suffering from plums?

And more - now lost in quirky obscurity to all who are not privy to the secret lives of 1917 Malton pupils.

School societies appear to consist of the Literary and Debating Society, House Concerts, and a Reading Circle, which met every Friday evening to read such works as Henry VIII and Romeo and Juliet, under Miss Shapley's direction.

Sports results are limited to Football, Hockey and Netball amongst the Houses, and W or L are the closest we get to scores.

The Maltonian was born. Not a major work of literature, dated in style and at times obscure in content, and probably not a major success amongst its readers at the time: but successful enough to begin a run of 126 copies.